INTERMEDIATE PLUS GOLF CLASS

ARLEN BENTO JR. GOLF INSTRUCTOR

SAINTS GOLF COURSE PORT ST. LUCIE FLORIDA

Shoot Par Now 5 way image

Improve Your Golf Game with this On Course Golf Class Program, Mini Clinic, 9 Holes (Shoot Par Now), Supervised Play, Prizes & More!

You must be approved to participate in this program

This is a 4-week golf program designed to help intermediate players improve to more advanced player levels on the golf course by improving putting, short game, iron play, and driving. The program includes on-course play in “Shoot Par Now” format from (200 yards), all holes are played as Par 4 holes. (Par 3 holes are also played as Par 4 holes) The goal is for all players to score “36” for 9 holes. (Some players may play have to play 150 yards based on skill levels and or driving distance)

The program includes all course fees, range balls, instruction, supervised play, and prizes from our sponsors. 

 

Weekly Prizes:

3 par 4 scores in a row (Copper Tech Golf Glove – only 1 per week)
15 putts or less (Dozen Wilson Ultra Golf Balls – only 1 per week)
6 par 4 scores (Glove & Golf Balls – only 1 per week)
36 score for 9 holes (Voice Caddy GPS – only 1 per class)

Schedule:

2 pm – Mini Skill Clinic & Range Warm Up
3 pm – Course Play
6 pm – Play Score Card Review (Patio area)

Week 1 Mini Clinic (Grip, Stance, Ball Position & Alignment)
Week 2 Mini Clinic (Swing Build Drills, Set Up Positions PW, 7, 4 & Driver)
Week 3 Mini Clinic (Putting & Green Reading)
Week 4 Mini Clinic (Chipping, Pitching & Sand Play)

Players receive help with explanations of the rules of golf, the pace of play, golf course etiquette, how to keep score, how to track play stats, golf terminology & more!

Optional: Join Shoot Par Now 9-Hole Beginners League to earn a chance to win Prizes $40

Coach Bento’s Warm-Up Based On 100 Point Skills Testing Program

Putting

10 putts 3 feet (Goal make)

10 putts 5 feet (Goal make)

10 putts 10 feet (Goal 1 foot or make)

10 putts 20 feet (Goal 2 foot or make)

10 putts 30 feet (Goal 3 foot or make)

 

Chipping & Pitching

10 chip shots 30 feet (Goal 5 foot circle)

10 chip shots 40 feet (Goal 5 foot circle)

10 chip shots 50 feet (Goal 5 foot circle)

10 pitch shots 30 feet (Goal 5 foot circle)

10 pitch shots 40 feet (Goal 5 foot circle)

 

Warm-Up with short iron (GW, PW, 9 iron)

10 half shots (small shoulder turn, no hinge, use your knee, small follow-through)

10 3/4 shots (middle shoulder turn, lead shoulder down, set wrist hinge, use your knee, 3/4 follow through)

 

Short Iron (Mid stance ball position)

10 full shots (full shoulder turn, lead shoulder down, full wrist hinge, use your knee to start the downswing, full follow through)

 

Mid Iron (Mid stance ball position)

10 full shots (full shoulder turn, lead shoulder down, full wrist hinge, use your knee to start the downswing, full follow through)

 

Long Iron (1-2 inches forward of Mid stance ball position)

10 full shots (full shoulder turn, lead shoulder down, full wrist hinge, use your knee to start the downswing, full follow through)

 

Fairway (2-3 inches forward of Mid stance ball position)

10 full shots (full shoulder turn, lead shoulder down, full wrist hinge, use your knee to start the downswing, full follow through)

 

Driver (1-2 inches from lead foot heel, forward ball position, use your high lead shoulder and lower trail arm set up)

10 full shots (full shoulder turn, lead shoulder down, full wrist hinge, use your knee to start the downswing, full follow through)

Tips for Playing Golf Based on Shoot Par Now Program

 

PUTT – The size of the club swing motion determines distance, 1-2-3 putting, use palm grip, ball position forward toward inside front foot heel.

 

CHIP – The size of the club swing motion determines distance, use clock chipping small 7-5, medium 8-4, large 9-3, ball position back in the stance, play the ball off the back foot toe, keep weight on the front foot with a narrow stance, club grip should lean towards the front foot to deloft the club for lower running shot, turn both feet to the target, use finger grip, let club blade work under the ball, use your lead arm to pull through the ball, small leg motion and hip turn into release.

 

PITCH – The size of the club swing motion determines distance, clock pitch uses small 7-5, medium 8-4, and large 9-3 with a small wrist hinge, ball position forward in stance playoff front foot toe, keep the weight even with a narrow stance, club grip should even with club face use the loft the club for higher softer landing shot with less roll, turn both feet to the target, use finger grip, let club blade work under the ball, use your lead arm to pull through the ball, small leg motion and hip turn into release.

 

SAND – For a greenside bunker shot the ball should be played forward in a stance off the front toe, with a slightly open club face, make sure you use a wide stance, set your feet into the sand for support, and bend your knees, you are going to use a full swing motion with a Sand Wedge, your goal is to take a full swing, striking the sand 1 or 2 inches behind the golf ball allowing the club to glide under the ball, moving the sand, keeping the face of the club open to create a high shot that lands on the green softly.

 

SHORT IRONS (9, PW, SW) – Start with feet close together, take your stance, set your hands on your grip, bend your knees, and widen your feet equally shoulder width apart, the ball should be in the middle of your stance. For a short iron shot, you want to make sure that you strike the leading edge of your club down and under the ball trying to create a divot after the strike of the ball, this will help the ball up into the air.

 

MID IRONS (6, 7, 8) – Start with feet close together, take your stance, set your hands on your grip, bend your knees, and widen your feet equally shoulder width apart, the ball should be in the middle of your stance or just slightly forward of center. For a mid-iron shot, you want to make sure that you strike the leading edge of your club down and under the ball trying to create a divot after the strike of the ball, this will help the ball up into the air.

 

LONG IRONS / HYBRIDS (3, 4, 5) – Start with feet close together, take your stance, set your hands on your grip, bend your knees, and widen your feet equally shoulder width apart, the ball should be positioned slightly forward of the middle of your stance 1 or 2 inches. For a long iron / hybrid shot, you want to make sure that you strike the leading edge of your club under the ball trying to create a light shallow divot after the strike of the ball, this will help the ball up into the air.

 

FAIRWAYS (3W, 5W, 7W) – Start with feet close together, take your stance, set your hands on your grip, bend your knees, and widen your feet equally shoulder width apart, the ball should be positioned forward of the middle of your stance 3-4 inches, the ball will be closer to your front foot. For a fairway wood shot, you want to make sure that you strike the leading edge of your club under the ball trying to create a light shallow divot after the strike of the ball, this will help the ball up into the air.

 

DRIVER – Start with feet close together, take your stance, set your hands on your grip, bend your knees, and widen your feet by moving your back foot only, the ball should be positioned forward inside the heel of your front foot. For a driver shot, you want to make sure that you swing slightly up into the ball off the tee keeping your head back this will help the ball up into the air.

 

PRE-SHOT ROUTINE – Always start your golf shot from behind the ball looking at your target, you should have already determined what club to use based on your distance away from your target, part of that process should have been looking at your lie to make sure that the ball is sitting up nicely, the direction of the wind, they wind can cause the ball to go right or left and or further or shorter depending on which way it’s blowing. Use an intermediate target to help line you up to your target line, pick a small object, leaf, pebble, sand, different colored grass, or anything that you can focus on 1-2 feet in front of your ball, when you set up to swing, make sure your club face, feet, knees, hips and shoulders are aligned parallel to this target line.

 

SWING THOUGHTS – Best swing thought of all time, in your backswing, just turn your back to the target, in the downswing feel like the club is going close to your body allowing the club to feel like it is swinging inside out to your target line, finish your swing in balance holding you’re follow through for 2-3 seconds. Even if you are missing the shot, you will find working on this swing thought will create shots that move toward your target more often.

How to Create a Descending Blow with a Short Iron to Make the Golf Ball Go High and Land Soft on the Green in the Game of Golf

A descending blow is a type of golf shot where the club head strikes the ball with a downward motion, which results in a high, soft landing on the green. This shot is often used with short irons from the fairway.

Here are some tips for creating a descending blow on a short iron shot:

  1. Choke down: Choke down on the club, which means to grip the club closer to the shaft or lower down on the grip, this will give you more control and help you strike down on the ball.

  2. Ball position: Make sure the ball position is slightly forward in the stance from the center, you can also open your stance a little with a slightly narrow stance, 18-23 inches wide.

  3. Weight distribution: Transfer your weight forward towards your front foot during the swing to help create a descending blow.

  4. The angle of attack: Make sure to approach the ball with an angle of attack that is descending, so that the club head strikes the ball first and then the ground, you will feel like the swing is more vertical or up and down, you still have to turn your body a little in the back swing and follow through.

  5. Follow through: After striking the ball, follow through with a high finish, keeping the club head up and completing the swing in a high, upward motion, we like to call this move “High Chest”!

It may take some practice to get the feel for a descending blow, but with time and repetition, it can become a valuable shot in your golfing arsenal. Remember to start with slow swings and gradually build up speed as you get more comfortable with the shot.

 

Explain Ball Position as Related to the Golf Stance and Different Clubs in the Game of Golf

The ball position in a golfer’s stance is one of the key components of their swing, as it affects the trajectory and distance of the ball. The ball position should vary based on the type of club being used and the golfer’s personal preference.

Here are the general ball positions for different types of clubs:

  • Short irons (sand wedge, pitching wedge, and 9-iron): For short irons, the ball position should be near the center of the stance. This will result in a descending steeper blow into the ball by striking the ball first before the ground which will create a higher trajectory and more spin on the ball.

  • Middle irons (8-6 iron): For middle irons, the ball position should be 1 inch forward of center, between the center and the front of the stance.

  • Long irons (3-5 iron): For long irons, the ball position should be 2 inches forward of center, closer to the front foot. This will help create a shallow angle of attack for better contact and more distance

  • Hybrids: For hybrids, the ball position should be similar to that for the corresponding long iron.  In some cases a Hybrid does work better like a mid-iron, you may have to experiment to find what works best.

  • Fairway woods (3-wood, 5-wood, 7-wood, 9-wood): For fairway woods, the ball position should be 3 inches forward of the center of the stance, you may want to widen your stance slightly for more stability with your fairway woods for better contact and more distance.

  • Driver: For the driver, the ball position should be forward in the stance, near the front foot, and 5-6 inches forward from the center of the stance. This will allow for more of an up strike to the ball because it is sitting on a tee for a powerful swing and more distance.  You may want to widen your stance for more stability and better contact.

It’s important to note that these are general guidelines and that every golfer may have a slightly different preference. The key is to experiment with different ball positions and find what works best for you and your swing.

Explain how to take Relief from Temporary Standing Water on the Golf Course in the Fairway, around the Green or in a Bunker

In golf, if you hit your ball into a puddle of water or any other temporary standing water on the fairway or around the green, you can choose to either play the ball where it lies or take relief (move the ball to a different spot) without receiving a penalty.

Here’s how you would take relief from temporary standing water:

  1. Find the nearest spot: Look for the spot that is closest to your ball but not closer to the hole and not in the water.

  2. Measure one club length: Using the club with the longest shaft you have, measure one club length away from the nearest spot you found, making sure the spot is not closer to the hole.

  3. Drop the ball: Drop the ball at the nearest spot or the spot you measured one club length away from the nearest spot.

  4. Play the ball: Play the ball from the spot you dropped it at.

It’s important to remember that temporary standing water must be a temporary condition, not a long-standing water hazard or a casual water hazard.

If your ball lands in a bunker and there is temporary standing water, you can still take relief without penalty, but you cannot move the ball out of the bunker. In other words, the ball must still be in the bunker after you’ve taken relief.

Explain How to take Relief from a Man-Made Obstruction & Cart Parth in the Game of Golf

Taking relief from a man-made obstruction, such as a cart path, is covered by the USGA’s “Rules of Golf”. According to the rule, if a player’s ball lies on or touches a man-made object, such as a cart path, the player is entitled to take relief without penalty.

Here are the steps for taking relief from a man-made object:

  1. Identify the nearest point of relief: This is the point on the course nearest to the ball but not nearer the hole, and not on or in the object.

  2. Measure one club length: Using the club with the longest shaft, measure one club length from the identified nearest point of relief, no closer to the hole.

  3. Drop the ball: The player must drop the ball at the nearest point of relief, or the measured club length away from the nearest point of relief, no closer to the hole.

  4. Play the ball: The player can now play the ball as it lies unless a specific rule requires otherwise.

It’s important to note that the player must determine that their ball lies on or touches a man-made object and that taking relief is necessary. If they choose to play the ball as it lies, they are not entitled to take relief later on during the same hole.

Explain the Un-Playable Lie Rule in the Game of Golf

The “unplayable lie” rule is one of the rules in golf established by the USGA. According to the rule, if a player’s ball is in a spot where they believe it is not possible to make a stroke, they can declare the ball unplayable and take a penalty. The player then has three options for proceeding:

  1. They can play the ball as it lies, adding one penalty stroke to their score.

  2. They can drop the ball within two club-lengths of the original spot, no closer to the hole, adding one penalty stroke to their score.

  3. They can drop the ball behind the original spot, keeping that spot directly between the hole and the ball, adding one penalty stroke to their score.

It’s important to note that the player must determine that their ball is indeed unplayable and cannot declare a ball unplayable just to get relief from a difficult lie. Additionally, if the player’s ball is in a penalty area, they have the additional option of dropping the ball outside the penalty area, but they will incur a one-stroke penalty in this case as well.

Explain how to take Relief from Temporary Standing Water on the Golf Course in the Fairway, around the Green or in a Bunker

In golf, if you hit your ball into a puddle of water or any other temporary standing water on the fairway or around the green, you can choose to either play the ball where it lies or take relief (move the ball to a different spot) without receiving a penalty.

Here’s how you would take relief from temporary standing water:

  1. Find the nearest spot: Look for the spot that is closest to your ball but not closer to the hole and not in the water.

  2. Measure one club length: Using the club with the longest shaft you have, measure one club length away from the nearest spot you found, making sure the spot is not closer to the hole.

  3. Drop the ball: Drop the ball at the nearest spot or the spot you measured one club length away from the nearest spot.

  4. Play the ball: Play the ball from the spot you dropped it at.

It’s important to remember that temporary standing water must be a temporary condition, not a long-standing water hazard or a casual water hazard.

If your ball lands in a bunker and there is temporary standing water, you can still take relief without penalty, but you cannot move the ball out of the bunker. In other words, the ball must still be in the bunker after you’ve taken relief.

The Object of the Game of Golf

The object of the game is to complete each hole in the fewest strokes possible.

A stroke is counted each time the golfer strikes the ball with a club.
The golfer must tee off, or start the hole, from within the designated tee box.
The golfer must play the ball as it lies, without moving or improving the position of the ball.
The golfer must use the club to strike the ball, not the ground.
The golfer must play the ball within the bounds of the course, and not out of bounds.
The golfer must hole out, or complete the hole, with the fewest strokes possible.
Golfers must abide by the rules of the club or tournament they are playing in.
Golfers should always keep up with the pace of play and be ready to play when it’s their turn.
Golfers should always show proper etiquette and sportsmanship on the course.

10 most common rules of the game of golf as per the USGA

The ball must be played as it lies, without moving or improving the position of the ball.
The golfer must use the club to strike the ball.
A stroke is counted each time the golfer strikes the ball with a club.
The golfer must tee off, or start the hole, from within the designated tee box.
The golfer must play the ball within the bounds of the course, and not out of bounds.
The golfer must hole out, or complete the hole, with the fewest strokes possible.
The golfer may not touch the ground in a hazard or water hazard with their club before playing the ball.
The golfer may not take practice swings or move the ball while on the putting green.
The golfer must putt with the flagstick in the hole, unless it interferes with the stroke.
The golfer must replace the divot made by their club on the fairway.

Important Golf Etiquette Concepts

Be punctual: arrive at your tee time on time and be ready to play when it’s your turn.
Maintain a proper pace of play: keep up with the group in front of you and allow faster groups to play through.
Show respect for the course: repair ball marks on the green, replace divots on the fairway, and rake bunkers after playing out of them.
Show respect for other players: be quiet during their swings, do not distract them and avoid slow play.
Show respect for the game: dress appropriately, observe the rules and regulations and show good sportsmanship.
Be a good host: if you are playing with guests, make sure they understand the rules and etiquette of the game.
Be mindful of your mobile phone: turn it off or put it on silent, and avoid using it on the course.
Be gracious in victory and defeat: don’t gloat over a win or sulk over a loss, and be respectful of your opponents.
Show respect for the club’s facilities: take care of the club house, practice areas and other facilities, and follow the club’s rules and regulations.
Be prepared to help others: offer to help other players with their equipment, help them find a lost ball and be ready to lend a hand if needed.

Golf is a game that is built on traditions, respect, and good manners. By following these etiquette concepts, you can ensure that your round is enjoyable for yourself and for those around you.

Explain Stroke Play and How to Keep Score in the Game of Golf

Stroke play is one of the most common ways to play golf and keep score. In stroke play, a golfer completes a round of golf and counts the total number of strokes taken to complete the round. The golfer with the lowest number of strokes is the winner.

Here’s how to keep score in stroke play:

Each hole is assigned a par, which is the number of strokes that a good golfer should take to complete the hole. For example, a par-3 hole is typically completed in three strokes.

When a golfer completes a hole, they write down the number of strokes they took on their scorecard. For example, if a golfer completes a par-3 hole in four strokes, they would write “4” on their scorecard.

The golfer’s score for each hole is then compared to the hole’s par. If the golfer takes more strokes than par, they have a “bogey,” and if they take fewer strokes than par, they have a “birdie.”

The golfer’s total score for the round is the sum of the strokes taken on each hole. For example, if a golfer completes a round of 18 holes and takes 84 strokes, their total score for the round is 84.

The golfer with the lowest total score is the winner of the round.

In addition, golfer must abide by the rules of the game, and should take into account penalties or other strokes that may affect their score.

It’s important to keep accurate score, as it’s the only way to determine the winner of the round, and also it will help the player to identify areas of improvement in their game.

In stroke play, it’s also common to use the term “over par” or “under par” to describe a golfer’s score. For example, if a golfer completes a round with a score of 72, and the par for the course is 72, they are said to be “even par.” If a golfer completes a round with a score of 70, they are said to be “two under par.”

Explain Match Play and How to Keep Score in the Game of Golf

Match play is a different way to play golf and keep score compared to stroke play. In match play, instead of counting the total number of strokes taken to complete a round, players compete against each other on a hole-by-hole basis. The player who wins the most holes wins the match.

Here’s how to keep score in match play:

Each hole is worth one point.

At the end of each hole, the player who has taken the fewest strokes wins the hole.

If both players tie on a hole, it is considered a “halved” hole and both players earn half a point.

The overall match is won by the player who earns the most points over the course of the round.

If the match is tied after the final hole, it can be extended to a playoff until one player wins a hole.

Keep in mind that in match play, in addition to counting the strokes taken, players must also abide by the rules of the game and should take into account penalties or other strokes that may affect their score.

The player should also understand the specific format of the match, for example, if the match is played with handicap, then the player will be given a certain number of strokes depending on their handicap, and that will be added to their score.

In match play, it’s common to use the terms “up” or “down” to describe a golfer’s score. For example, if a golfer is “2 up” that means they are two holes ahead of the opponent. If a golfer is “1 down” they are one hole behind the opponent.

Keep in mind that match play is a different way of playing golf, it’s more focused on strategy and psychology and less on the total number of strokes taken. It’s a great way to enjoy the game and to test the player’s golfing skills.

Explain Red Stakes or Hazard Rules in Golf

In golf, a hazard is an area of the course that is designated as such by the course management. Hazards are typically marked with either red or yellow stakes or lines.

Red stakes or lines indicate a lateral hazard. Lateral hazards are typically bodies of water such as lakes, rivers or creeks that run parallel to the hole being played.

When a golfer’s ball comes to rest in a lateral hazard, the golfer has several options on how to proceed. They can either play the ball as it lies, which means trying to hit the ball out of the hazard, or they can take a penalty stroke and play the ball from a designated drop area. The golfer must also choose a club to play the ball with, but doesn’t have to play the ball with the club he or she dropped it with.

Another option is to play the ball out of the hazard under a stroke and distance rule, which means the player must drop the ball where the original ball lay and add one penalty stroke.

Additionally, yellow stakes or lines indicate a hazards known as “Water Hazards” that are typically bodies of water such as ponds, lakes or creeks that run perpendicular to the hole being played. The rules for playing a ball out of a yellow-staked water hazard are similar to those for a red-staked lateral hazard, but there are some key differences, such as not being able to drop the ball on the opposite side of the hazard or drop it within two club-lengths of the point where the ball last crossed the margin of the hazard.

It is important to note that these rules may vary depending on the tournament or course you are playing on, so it’s always good to check the local rules before starting your round.

Explain White Stakes or Out-Of-Bounds Stakes on the Golf Course

In golf, out of bounds (OB) is an area that is designated as such by the course management, and is typically marked with white stakes or lines. These areas are areas where a ball is considered out of bounds and are usually areas that are not part of the golf course, such as adjacent property or roads.

When a golfer’s ball comes to rest out of bounds, the golfer must take a penalty stroke and play the ball from the spot where it went out of bounds, or from a point that is equidistant from the hole and the point where the ball went out of bounds, whichever is closer to the hole.

Another option is to take a drop in the nearest fairway, with one stroke penalty.

It’s important to remember that when a golfer’s ball is out of bounds, the golfer must not play another ball from where the original ball was played, but rather must proceed under the rules as described above.

It is important to note that these rules may vary depending on the tournament or course you are playing on, so it’s always good to check the local rules before starting your round.

Explain Rules, Etiquette on the Putting Green in the Game of Golf

The putting green is an important part of the game of golf, and there are several rules and etiquette guidelines that should be followed when playing on it. Some of the most important include:

Repairing ball marks: If you find a ball mark on the green, you should repair it by pressing the edges of the mark together with your finger or a ball mark repair tool.

Replacing divots: If you take a divot out of the green, you should replace it by filling it with sand or seed.

Avoiding damage to the green: Avoid using your golf club to mark your ball or to tap down spike marks.

Prioritizing pace of play: Keep up with the group in front of you and be ready to play when it’s your turn.

Allowing other players to putt out: If you are on the green and another player is putting, do not walk across the line of their putt or cause any distraction.

Avoiding slow play: Do not take unnecessary practice strokes on the green or take too much time to line up your putt.

Showing respect for the flagstick: When the flagstick is in the hole, do not touch it or lean on it.

Replacing the flagstick: After you have putted out, make sure to replace the flagstick in the hole.

Showing respect for other players: Do not distract or talk to other players while they are putting.

Following the local rules: Always familiarize yourself with the local rules of the course, as they may differ from club to club.

By following these rules and etiquette guidelines, you can ensure that your round is enjoyable for yourself and for those around you, and make the game more fair, smooth and pleasant for all players.

Explain Rules and Tips for Playing out of a Sand Bunker in the Game of Golf

A sand bunker, also known as a “sand trap,” is a hazard on a golf course that is filled with sand. There are specific rules and tips for playing out of a sand bunker that can help a golfer successfully navigate this type of hazard.

The first rule to keep in mind is that a golfer’s club may not touch the sand in the bunker before the ball. This is called a “bunker shot” and it results in a penalty stroke.

To play a bunker shot, you will need to open the clubface of your sand wedge or lob wedge, and keep your weight forward during the swing. This will help you hit behind the ball and propel the sand, rather than the ball, out of the bunker.

Keep your eye on the ball and make sure to follow through on your swing.

Use a sweeping motion to make contact with the sand, focusing on striking the sand about an inch behind the ball.

Make sure to keep your grip light and relaxed to avoid digging the club into the sand.

Another tip to keep in mind is to avoid digging your feet into the sand. This can cause you to lose your balance and make it more difficult to hit a good shot.

Make sure to check the local rules of the course regarding the bunker, some courses allow the player to ground their club in the bunker, some not.

When you are on the green, make sure to rake the sand trap after you have played your shot. This helps keep the bunker in good condition for other players and ensures a smooth and fair game for everyone.

By following these rules and tips, you can successfully play out of a sand bunker and avoid any penalties or mistakes. Keep in mind that it takes practice and patience to master the bunker shot, and that it’s a good idea to practice your bunker shots before you play a round of golf.

ADDRESS

Saints Golf Course

2601 SE Morningside Blvd

Port St. Lucie, FL 34952

(772) 398 2901

 

GOLF COURSE HOURS

Open 7 Days A Week

6:30 am to 7 pm

 

 

ACADEMY HOURS

 

Monday 9 am to 6 pm

Tuesday 9 am to 6 pm

Wednesday 9 am to 6 pm

Thursday 9 am to 6 pm

Friday 9 am to 6 pm

Saturday 9 am to 6 pm

Sunday 2 pm to 6 pm

 

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